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In the backstory, Jacob arrives at his uncle Laban 's settlement to escape from his older brother Esau , and falls in love at first sight with his cousin Rachel.

She reciprocates his feelings, as - secretly - does her sister Leah. Jacob asks Laban for permission to marry Rachel, offering his service to Laban in exchange.

Rachel, fearing the consummation of the marriage, switches places with her sister at the wedding. Jacob and Leah share a passionate bridal night.

The next morning, he pretends to be upset, informs Laban of the trick, and demands the right to marry Rachel, now upping the stakes by claiming Bilhah and Zilpah as compensation.

Over the next several years, Leah, Bilhah, Zilpah give birth to several sons. Rachel remains childless, until she finally has a son, Joseph , who becomes Jacob's favorite.

Soon after, Dinah is born to Leah, and is doted on by her family as the only girl. The tension between Jacob and Laban reaches its climax following the suicide of Laban's abused wife.

Jacob takes his wives, children, and livestock, and departs to establish a new settlement. They encounter his estranged older brother, Esau, and the matriarch, Rebekah.

Dinah finds her grandmother testy and ruthless towards lower-class civilians. Rachel is a talented midwife and takes her niece as apprentice.

In an altercation and power struggle, Jacob barges into the Red Tent, and seizes and destroys the teraphim , the women's goddess figurines.

After settling near the city of Shechem , Dinah and Rachel are called to the palace to assist at a birth. Despite her aunt's warning to guard her honor, Dinah meets and falls in love with Prince Shalem, son of the king.

The two quickly decide to marry ; the king approves, and the marriage is consummated. When he is told of this fait accompli , Jacob is furious that he has not been consulted, as the customs of his tribe expect.

Leah blames Rachel for putting romantic fantasies into Dinah's head. Dinah's brothers, Simeon and Levi, interpret the events as seduction and defilement.

All the men of the tribe feel insulted and dishonored. Shalem's father offers to pay any bride price they name, to make matters right, but they spurn his gifts.

Joseph asks his brothers in exasperation if they want Prince Shalem's foreskin, and they seize on this suggestion, saying that the only thing that will satisfy their honor is for all the men of Shechem to be circumcised.

Shalem and his father, to their surprise, agree, and all the men of the city undergo the operation. A couple of nights later, the brothers but not Joseph attack the palace while the men are in pain and unable to defend themselves, murdering Shalem, his father, and all the men they can find.

Full of anger and grief, Dinah curses her father and brothers for their sins, and disowns them. Dinah is pregnant, and her formidable mother-in-law, an Egyptian princess, takes her to safety in Thebes.

She gives birth to a son whom she names Bar-Shalem son of the sunset. However, the Queen, blaming Dinah for the death of her son, claims the baby as her own, names him Ra-Mose and forbids Dinah from revealing the truth.

Dinah tries to flee with her son but is caught and beaten into obedience. The Queen permits her to attend her son only as wetnurse and handmaid ; she is forced to live as a slave for the next ten years, unwilling to leave him.

Simeon and Levi, jealous of Jacob's favoritism towards Joseph, kidnap their brother and sell him into slavery, and then present his bloody coat as proof that he has been killed, devastating the family.

After Ra-Mose is sent away to become a scribe, Dinah is released from the Queen's service, but she still chooses to stay in Thebes and waits another seven years for her son's return.

In that time Joseph, who has the power of prophecy, is discovered by the Pharaoh; Joseph interprets his dream and is named the Vizier of Egypt, under the name Zaphnath-Paaneah.

Ra-Mose returns to Thebes as the Queen is dying. She reconciles with Dinah by giving her the shawl that Shalem had given her at their first meeting.

Ra-Mose discovers that Dinah is his mother, and that her brothers murdered his father. He feels that she is as guilty as they, and rejects her.

With her purpose for staying in Thebes lost, Dinah leaves to start a new life. She marries a kind man named Benia, and begins to practise midwifery again.

One day she is summoned to the palace: the wife of the vizier is having a difficult labor. The person summoning her is her son Ra-Mose and the vizier turns out to be her brother Joseph.

After Joseph's wife has given birth to a boy, Ra-Mose begs his mother for forgiveness and asks Dinah to tell him the history of her family.

Later that night, Dinah and Joseph reunite for the first time in years. Joseph informs Dinah that their mothers have died; Leah died three years prior, peacefully in her sleep, and Rachel died giving birth to a son, Benjamin.

Initiating teenage girls into a circle of trusted older women provides them with a network who they can turn to when they need guidance, rather than being blindly led by their peers or seeking guidance from magazines sponsored by a corporate agenda.

This provides an authentic foundation of practical support so they can make the necessary errors in judgement that are universal on the road to wisdom.

Wisdom was also imparted through the oral tradition of storytelling that provided an archetypal framework for growing beyond our perceived challenges.

By taking responsibility for our emotional well being through a monthly practice we also lessen our need for emotional comfort through overeating, as the sacral energy centre which resides in the abdomen is governed by the moon.

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Jul 15,

And most importantly should I now wonder what my legacy as a woman will be or in the 21st century should I discount this and think only of my legacy and story as a person?

This is an epic tale based on the Biblical character Dinah and her life. I found the story very moving, and much credit goes to the author, Anita Diamant.

I think she is a great storyteller, a la Barbara Kingsolver and John Irving. Although I was familiar with Dinah and what happened to her from having read her story in the Bible, Ms.

Diamant's story is much richer and complex. Though I should add that some religious people, especially those who believe Bible to be literally true, may be offende This is an epic tale based on the Biblical character Dinah and her life.

Though I should add that some religious people, especially those who believe Bible to be literally true, may be offended and I can see them accusing Ms Diamant of distorting the "truth.

I was surprised how much I was taken in by Dinah and felt emotionally connected to her, e,g. I think the credit goes to Ms.

Diamant for developing her characters, especially, but not only, Dinah, in a manner that I totally found believable and it transported me from my world to that of Dinah.

Even more surprising to me was that I found myself being envious of the close, nurturing relationship that the women share in the book, especially when they are in the red tent birthing or menstruating.

It's rather sad that men have nothing equivalent and what passes for "male bonding" is, in my opinion, quite pathetic and immature in comparison beers and football?

Gimme a break! And may be it's even sadder that, as far as I know, now there is nothing remotely like that for women either.

There is a strong theme of Goddess worshipping and celebration of the female power in the story. Bottom line: this a story that very much appealed to me on an emotional and intellectual level.

Highly recommended! View 2 comments. Dec 06, Joe Krakovsky rated it did not like it. I did not finish reading this book because on a personal level I found it too disgusting.

To use a phrase so much in vogue right now, I found it very offensive on various levels. To begin with, it seemed that the book centered around the menstrual period of women.

Yes, I know it is a fact of life, but come on, do you have to be so uncouth? I lose a lot of I did not finish reading this book because on a personal level I found it too disgusting.

I lose a lot of respect for authors who feel that by writing about such basic human things that they are somehow being truthful and honest.

Can I deal with life? Sure, but that isn't the point. When I was in Basic Training in the Army we still had the old wooden barracks with the row of toilets with no privacy between them.

In high school we had swimming in PE were we swam nude. On another level of disgust was the treatment of the men.

Boy, if I wrote about women like that I would have militants threatening to burn down my house.

But I guess double standards are ok if you are politically correct. Well, you know what? Not everybody is a pervert, just like not everybody is a murderer, or a thief.

The story line was utter nonsense. Ignoring the atheist viewpoints for the moment, the holy men were different and that was what set them apart.

If being a sinner like everybody else was ok, why were they chosen or singled out for blessings?

Because they were cool? Attacking or poking fun at the ancient prophets of several of the world's religions is never a good thing, especially in this day and age.

View all 34 comments. Oct 29, K. Shelves: retelling , religion , drama. For me, this is a book that is hard not to like.

Last month, I and some friends here in Goodreads agreed to read the Bible for 12 months. Most of us are now on the seventh book, Judges and so far, my favorite is still Genesis.

The reason is that there are just too many interesting events in it and so many unforgettable characters whose stories can be told and retold many times but we will not be tired hearing about them.

One of these stories is that of Isaac and Sara who have two sons, Esau and J For me, this is a book that is hard not to like.

One of these stories is that of Isaac and Sara who have two sons, Esau and Jacob. Jacob steals the firstborn title from Esau with the help of Sara.

Later Jacob meets Laban, the businessman. All of these become Jacob's wives giving him his 12 sons and only one daughter: Dinah.

Diamant took interest on her name and thought of all that could happen to her. She did not change anything in the backdrop story.

She only extended and expanded what she thought could have been the untold story and she did it beautifully.

It is an easy read. Something that you can do while in a busy Starbucks outlet listening to rich kids discussing their term papers and school projects.

I finished the bulk of this book the other night while waiting for my daughter from her band practice. This could have earned more stars from me had Diamant been more descriptive in her narration.

I also felt that she put too much emphasis on her female characters. All the male characters were delineated with secondary roles which are all flat and unfeeling.

This made the rampaging and horrendous mass murder committed by Simon and Levi in the palace too unbelievable to get any sympathy from me for Dinah.

I thought that the life-long curse and her going back to the palace is too melodramatic that I felt like watching an corny movie hoping to get an Oscar nomination for an overacting aspiring actress.

Overall, I liked it. Not jumping up and down though. View all 13 comments. Nov 24, Matt rated it it was ok. Okay, so I knew before I read this book that it wasn't written for my demographic.

I'm an adult male. This is a woman's book through and through. With that disclaimer in place, take what I'm about to say worth a grain of salt: I really didn't care for this book.

It tracks the life of a quaternary character in Genesis, Dinah, from before her birth to after her death. Diamant takes massive, bu Okay, so I knew before I read this book that it wasn't written for my demographic.

Diamant takes massive, but necessary, liberties with the story. There simply isn't enough in the initial account to tell a bedtime story, let alone a novel.

She expands Dinah's life into an ensign for the lives, loves, and losses of women everywhere. And if that sounds a little melodramatic, that's because the novel itself strikes that melodramatic tone.

Diamant writes in a beautiful voice, and develops stirring and evocative passages describing both the internal and external environs of Dinah's life.

She immerses the reader in a very foreign culture and world, and does so without pandering or over-explaining the culture--all the while refraining from the obtuseness or clumsy colloquialism that is often found in this type of novel.

The major themes of the joy of menstruation and child birth, the origin of life in the shedding of blood, drench the pages of this novel if you'll excuse the pun.

As a man, I simply can't identify with this theme. But besides my ability to "sync my cycle," as it were, my biggest problem with this book lies in the story itself.

Dinah's one or two verse mention in Genesis is so brief and so vague. Diamant's artistic license creates a story that is just not believable.

Dinah is like Forrest Gump; she's there for every major event, she meets all the important people, and it just seems all a little too convenient.

Additionally, Diamant disregards the biblical narrative of the events actually described to such an extent that the very nature of those events is nearly unrecognizable.

Diamant also makes mistakes in this novel: first she alternates between an extremely awkward 2nd person voice and a 3rd person voice.

Secondly, the book, despite being crammed with drama after drama and event after event, was poorly paced. Too much description of the unimportant things, not enough of the ones that affect the story.

Overall, The Red Tent is not a book for me. I can't identify with the themes of the book, and the shortcomings in the writing are substantial enough that I'm unable to bridge that gap.

View all 3 comments. I'll have to think about this I may go back and add another star, depending on what stays with me. I think if I wasn't reading this book through a Latter-day Saint lens, I would have given it four stars, because the prose is absolutely gorgeous.

You know, the twelve sons of Jacob. It is written by Anita Diamant, and does a wonderful job of giving motivation to all the things that happen from the ti I'll have to think about this It is written by Anita Diamant, and does a wonderful job of giving motivation to all the things that happen from the time Jacob meets Rachel through where Simeon she calls him Simon and Levi kill Dinah's husband.

She also does a beautiful, heart-tenderizing job of tying each of us as women to the concourse of womanhood from the beginning of time.

My friend gave me this book for Christmas. As I read about the ties of womanhood, I realize what she was thinking of as she gave me this book, for she and I, and she and my mother, and I and her mother are all tied together by many of the red strings that Ms Diamant speaks of.

The reason I had to put off reading it for five months is that I've been teaching a class in Old Testament, and since it's been about fifteen years since I've taught the class, or even studied the Old Testament, I've not had discretionary time to read.

However, it was a wonderful segue into this book. The scenes in the King James Version are still fresh in my mind, and I was able to appreciate how she wove them in.

However, her treatment of Joseph has left a bad taste in my mouth. Though she has the tale come from an enemy of Joseph's, the word is that he bedded Potipher's wife, rather than the story we get in Genesis.

In that and in other things she paints him as an opportunist and hints that he is gay. But then, that is Dinah talking, and she never has forgiven her brothers.

But, listen to one of her final paragraphs: Egypt loved the lotus because it never dies. It is the same for people who are loved.

Thus can something as insignificant as a name--two syllables, one high, one sweet--summon up the innumerable smiles and tears, sighs and dreams of a human life.

Ah, what the heck. I'll give it four stars. That's what will stay with me. Oct 07, Emily May rated it liked it Shelves: , historical-fiction , feminism.

I thought the first half of The Red Tent was very compelling. I liked the focus on the female relationships - a complex web of love, teamwork and jealousies - and enjoyed seeing the story behind the story we know.

My favourite parts were near the beginning when we learn about Leah, Rachel, Zilpah and Bilhah growing up and becoming Jacob's wives, and their subsequent forays into motherhood.

Unlike some readers, I had no problem with the female-centric feel to the novel. In fact, it seems like a fu I thought the first half of The Red Tent was very compelling.

In fact, it seems like a funny and strange criticism when considering that this book sets out to offer a female perspective on a story that pretty much ignored women for centuries.

I think The Red Tent might not work for you so much if you're reading as a fan of the biblical story and don't want to explore perspectives that change the way we view certain characters.

As a nonreligious reader, though, I really enjoyed it. Well, that is, until Dinah moves to Egypt and things became The truth is that, for me, Dinah's character paled in comparison to all the different and interesting personalities I found in the four sisters.

I really like first-person narratives that focus on other characters - everything from Wuthering Heights to Tiger Lily - because it offers an up-close account whilst also viewing a number of characters equally.

So I liked this book more when Dinah's narrative was not about her, but about her mothers. The second half grew boring and tiring, and I honestly struggled to finish.

It's a shame because I really loved the earlier chapters. Feb 08, Manybooks rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-fiction , folklore-myth-religion , book-reviews , favourites-read.

Now perhaps I am being a bit hypocritical here, as I do in fact realise that I am more often than not rather majorly pedantic with regard to historical fiction depicting the truth or perhaps more to the point, showing and presenting as much of the truth, as much of historic reality as possible.

But come on, considering that Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is primarily based on the Old Testament, one could and likely even should and with my apologies to those of you who actually do consider ALL o Now perhaps I am being a bit hypocritical here, as I do in fact realise that I am more often than not rather majorly pedantic with regard to historical fiction depicting the truth or perhaps more to the point, showing and presenting as much of the truth, as much of historic reality as possible.

But come on, considering that Anita Diamant's The Red Tent is primarily based on the Old Testament, one could and likely even should and with my apologies to those of you who actually do consider ALL of the Bible as somehow being the absolute truth point out that Ms.

Diamant is with The Red Tent actually and also portraying a story that was even in its original Biblical manifestations rather fantastical and at best probably much more fiction than non-fiction, namely the story of Jacob, his sons and his one daughter Dinah who is sadly hardly mentioned at all in the Old Testament stories concerning the former.

And like my GR friend Chrissie, for me as a reading woman, imagining and thinking about a custom like the concept and culture of a red tent , a special women-only place and space for Jacob's wives, concubines and daughters to celebrate their womanhood, their menstruation as a festival of the earth and yes, even in the patriarchal monotheistic household of Jacob, as a celebration of goddess, of female power, that is at least for me personally, an uplifting and strengthening reading experience.

But really and frankly, from where I stand, much of especially the Old Testament actually and often deliberately celebrates and even at times naivily seems to justify murder, mayhem and even genocide as being both acceptable and somehow God-ordained if it is perpetrated against those whom the Israelites consider as enemies and sorry, if that is not at best naive if not disgustingly sinful, I do not know what is.

And also, I furthermore do think that we are pretty darn fortunate to still live in a free generally secular country where reimagined Biblical tales such as The Red Tent are both accepted and permitted, because in a so-called theocracy, like for example, Saudi Arabia, Anita Diamant could have and likely would have been more than simply criticised for The Red Tent.

And therefore let us hope and yes let us pray that this kind of religious and philosophical, democratic personal freedom remains and that so-called sacred texts will not suddenly be deemed as officially inappropriate for fiction purposes or for criticism.

For I do not think I am being all that needlessly alarmist here, as there have sadly been increasingly strident calls in especially the United States and Canada from the religiously ignorant and fanatic lunatic fringe, from the Taliban like and at its most fundamentalist very dangerous Religious Right to ban, censor, to not even permit the untouchable and supposedly "God-given" words of the Bible to be used for literature, for any kind of rewritten, retold pieces of work.

Four stars and no, not yet five stars, as I have not in fact enjoyed the second part of The Red Tent quite as much as the first part, in other words, that Dinah's experiences in Egypt, while interesting and engaging, are not really as close to my heart and soul as the first part of the novel, as Anita Diamant's brilliant and oh so entrancing descriptions of Dinah's childhood experiences, although I am still going to be gladly placing The Red Tent on my favourites shelf.

Jan 07, Peggy rated it did not like it. Okay, I really struggled through this book. I loved reading from the perspective of a woman in the Old Testament.

That part was great. There were just some disturbing things in there--like Jacob masturbating-- there is worse than that in the book, believe me that I thought were AWFUL.

In the end, Jose Okay, I really struggled through this book. In the end, Joseph is portrayed as a selfish, illiterate tyrant who hated his younger brother Benjamin and who willingly slept with Potipher's wife.

So for the most part, I just didn't like it. I did manage to read the whole thing, and enjoyed reading about Dinah making the most of her life and incorporating things she learned from her mothers.

I loved getting to know Zilpah and Bilhah better.. If you are at all familiar with the OT, don't read this book! May 09, Wendy rated it really liked it Shelves: books , may The first time I read this book years ago my frustration stemmed from primarily the depiction of the various characters.

However, this time I decided to read it slowly so that I could focus and absorb the characters and the story.

I loved the celebration of a strong female character and heroine. I loved Dinah's quiet strength, her confidence and her self-awareness.

Anita Diamant was able to sweep me up and carry me away to another time and place. A place where there is The first time I read this book years ago my frustration stemmed from primarily the depiction of the various characters.

A place where there is a "Red Tent" that I wish was here. View all 12 comments. Sep 22, Books Ring Mah Bell rated it it was ok.

My apologies to Anita Diamant. This book is good, in the sense that she takes an interesting concept a bit of the bible and expounds upon it.

And, in all fairness, she wrote well. Alas, this was just NOT my cup of tea. No sir. Here I'd like to throw in a disclaimer that I am not one who finds the Bible holy.

If I were and then I read this book, I'm thinking I may have been offended. So, be warned if you think you are getting biblical fiction that is All I can say about this is t My apologies to Anita Diamant.

All I can say about this is there's a whole lot of sheep humping and Jacob jerking off early on in the book. Then again, there's bestiality in the bible Be warned.

Why didn't this book float my boat? The red tent - refers to a place the woman all go when ill, giving birth or menstruating.

Dear GOD. Yes, I went there. That's one of my problems with women - those hormone surges can be MAD unpleasant. Birth - Thank heavens for medical care!

Now, I have nothing at all against midwives, in fact, I think women who labor and give birth at home as long as they are healthy enough to do so are kick ass.

Honestly, all the birth without epidurals and such That being said, I would have perished along with my son in the red tent. So, thank you medicine for epidurals, c-sections that a mom can survive, and for great neonatal care.

Call me old fashioned, a prude, whatever, but I dig this thing called monogamy. IMDb Picks: December. Seriale vazute. Best TV shows.

Historical Series. Movies to watch because I've read the book. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin.

Episodes Seasons. Edit Cast Series cast summary: Minnie Driver Leah 2 episodes, Iain Glen Jacob 2 episodes, Will Tudor Joseph 2 episodes, Vinette Robinson Bilhah 2 episodes, Debra Winger Rebecca 2 episodes, Pedro Lloyd Gardiner Levi 2 episodes, Saif Al-Warith Simon 2 episodes, Douglas Rankine Reuben 2 episodes, Agni Scott Zilpah 2 episodes, Sofie Golding-Spittle Werenro 2 episodes, Morena Baccarin Dinah 2 episodes, Hiam Abbass Royal Messenger 2 episodes, Aouatefe Lahmani Learn more More Like This.

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A Promise Drama Romance. The Borgias — Crime Drama History. The series is based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Anita Diamant.

It is the time of the Old Testament patriarchs of the Book of Genesis. Dinah , the only daughter of Leah and Jacob , chronicles her story from youth through adulthood.

She narrates her relationship with her parents, aunts, and eleven older brothers. She often focuses on the significance of the Red Tent, occupied by the women of her tribe including Jacob's other three wives Rachel , Bilhah and Zilpah during their time of menstruation.

The women have kept alive their old traditions of goddess-worship unbeknownst to their Israelite husbands, managing to keep this secret since men are not allowed in the Red Tent.

In the backstory, Jacob arrives at his uncle Laban 's settlement to escape from his older brother Esau , and falls in love at first sight with his cousin Rachel.

She reciprocates his feelings, as - secretly - does her sister Leah. Jacob asks Laban for permission to marry Rachel, offering his service to Laban in exchange.

Rachel, fearing the consummation of the marriage, switches places with her sister at the wedding. Jacob and Leah share a passionate bridal night.

The next morning, he pretends to be upset, informs Laban of the trick, and demands the right to marry Rachel, now upping the stakes by claiming Bilhah and Zilpah as compensation.

Over the next several years, Leah, Bilhah, Zilpah give birth to several sons. Rachel remains childless, until she finally has a son, Joseph , who becomes Jacob's favorite.

Soon after, Dinah is born to Leah, and is doted on by her family as the only girl. The tension between Jacob and Laban reaches its climax following the suicide of Laban's abused wife.

Jacob takes his wives, children, and livestock, and departs to establish a new settlement. They encounter his estranged older brother, Esau, and the matriarch, Rebekah.

Dinah finds her grandmother testy and ruthless towards lower-class civilians. Rachel is a talented midwife and takes her niece as apprentice.

In an altercation and power struggle, Jacob barges into the Red Tent, and seizes and destroys the teraphim , the women's goddess figurines.

After settling near the city of Shechem , Dinah and Rachel are called to the palace to assist at a birth. Despite her aunt's warning to guard her honor, Dinah meets and falls in love with Prince Shalem, son of the king.

The two quickly decide to marry ; the king approves, and the marriage is consummated. When he is told of this fait accompli , Jacob is furious that he has not been consulted, as the customs of his tribe expect.

Leah blames Rachel for putting romantic fantasies into Dinah's head. Dinah's brothers, Simeon and Levi, interpret the events as seduction and defilement.

All the men of the tribe feel insulted and dishonored. Shalem's father offers to pay any bride price they name, to make matters right, but they spurn his gifts.

Joseph asks his brothers in exasperation if they want Prince Shalem's foreskin, and they seize on this suggestion, saying that the only thing that will satisfy their honor is for all the men of Shechem to be circumcised.

Shalem and his father, to their surprise, agree, and all the men of the city undergo the operation.

Red Tent Video

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